Urban Informatics » From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen (MIT Press 2011)

From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen:
Urban Informatics, Social Media, Ubiquitous Computing, and Mobile Technology to Support Citizen Engagement

Edited by

Marcus Foth, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Laura Forlano, Cornell University, USA
Christine Satchell, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Martin Gibbs, University of Melbourne, Australia

Web 2.0 tools, including blogs, wikis, and photo sharing and social networking sites, have made possible a more participatory Internet experience. Much of this technology is available for mobile phones, where it can be integrated with such device-specific features as sensors and GPS. From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen examines how this increasingly open, collaborative, and personalizable technology is shaping not just our social interactions but new kinds of civic engagement with cities, communities, and spaces. It offers analyses and studies from around the world that explore how the power of social technologies can be harnessed for social engagement in urban areas.

Chapters by leading researchers in the emerging field of urban informatics outline the theoretical context of their inquiries, describing a new view of the city as a hybrid that merges digital and physical worlds; examine technology-aided engagement involving issues of food, the environment, and sustainability; explore the creative use of location-based mobile technology in cities from Melbourne, Australia, to Dhaka, Bangladesh; study technological innovations for improving civic engagement; and discuss design research approaches for understanding the development of sentient real-time cities, including interaction portals and robots.

The MIT Press

Foth, M., Forlano, L., Satchell, C., & Gibbs, M. (Eds.) (2011). From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen: Urban Informatics, Social Media, Ubiquitous Computing, and Mobile Technology to Support Citizen Engagement. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

7 x 9 • 544 pp. • 108 illus. • ISBN 978-0-262-01651-3 • US$50.00 • cloth

About the Editors

Marcus Foth, Founder and Director of the Urban Informatics Research Lab, is Associate Professor and Principal Research Fellow with the Institute for Creative Industries and Innovation at Queensland University of Technology. Laura Forlano is a Postdoctoral Associate at Cornell University. Christine Satchell is Senior Research Fellow at the Urban Informatics Research Lab. Martin Gibbs is a Lecturer in the Department of Information Systems at the University of Melbourne.

For more information visit the MIT Press website: http://mitpress.mit.edu/9780262016513 or QUT eprints >

Section 1: Theories of Engagement

Foreword
Phoebe Sengers, Cornell University, USA

1. The Ideas and Ideals in Urban Media Theory
Martijn de Waal, University of Groningen, NL

2. The Moral Economy of Social Media
Paul Dourish, University of California, Irvine, USA, & Christine Satchell, QUT, Australia

3. The Protocological Surround: Reconceptualising Radio and Architecture in the Wireless City
Gillian Fuller, & Ross Harley, University of NSW, Australia

4. Mobile Media and the Strategies of Urban Citizenship: Control, Responsibilisation, Politicisation
Kurt Iveson, University of Sydney, Australia

Section 2: Civic Engagement

Foreword
Yvonne Rogers, Open University, UK

5. Advancing Design for Sustainable Food Cultures
Jaz Hee-jeong Choi, QUT, & Eli Blevis, Indiana University, USA

6. Building Digital Participation Hives: Toward a Local Public Sphere
Fiorella de Cindio, & Cristian Peraboni, University of Milano, Italy

7. Between Experience, Affect, and Information: Experimental Urban Interfaces in the Climate Change Debate
Jonas Fritsch, & Martin Brynskov, Aarhus University, Denmark

8. More than Friends: Social and Mobile Media for Activist Organizations
Tad Hirsch, Intel People and Practices Research, USA

9. Gardening Online: A Tale of Suburban Informatics
Bjorn Nansen, Jon Pearce, & Wally Smith, University of Melbourne, Australia

10. The Rise of the Expert Amateur: Citizen Science and Micro-Volunteerism
Eric Paulos, Sunyoung Kim, & Stacey Kuznetsov, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Section 3: Creative Engagement

Foreword
Gary Marsden, University of Cape Town, South Africa

11. Street Haunting: Sounding the Invisible City
Sarah Barns, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

12. Family Worlds: Technological Engagement for Families Negotiating Urban Traffic
Hilary Davis, Peter Francis, Bjorn Nansen, & Frank Vetere, University of Melbourne, Australia

13. Urban Media: New Complexities, New Possibilities — A Manifesto
Christopher Kirwan, & Sven Travis, Parsons — The New School for Design, USA

14. Bjørnetjeneste: Using the City as a Backdrop for Location-Based Interactive Narratives
Jeni Paay, & Jesper Kjeldskov, Aalborg University, Denmark

15. Mobile Interactions as Social Machines: Poor Urban Youth at Play in Bangladesh
Andrew Wong, & Richard Ling, Telenor Research & Innovation, Malaysia

Section 4: Technologies of Engagement

Foreword
Atau Tanaka, Newcastle University, UK

16. Sensing, Projecting and Interpreting Digital Identity through Bluetooth: From Anonymous Encounters to Social Engagement
Ava Fatah gen. Schieck 1, Freya Palmer 2, Alan Penn 1, & Eamonn O’Neill 2
1 University College London, UK, 2 University of Bath, UK

17. The Policy and Export of Ubiquitous Place: Investigating South Korean U‐Cities
Germaine Halegoua, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

18. Engaging Citizens and Community with the UBI-Hotspots
Timo Ojala, Hannu Kukka, Tommi Heikkinen, Tomas Lindén, Marko Jurmu, Simo Hosio, & Fabio Kruger, University of Oulu, Finland

19. Crowdsensing in the Web: Analyzing the Citizen Experience in the Urban Space
Francisco C. Pereira, Andrea Vaccari, Fabien Giardin, Carnaven Chiu, & Carlo Ratti, Senseable City Lab, MIT, USA

20. Empowering Urban Communities through Social Commonalities
Laurianne Sitbon, Peter Bruza, Renato Iannella, & Sarath Indrakanti, National ICT Australia

Section 5: Design Engagement

Foreword
Mark Blythe, University of York, UK

21. A Streetscape Portal
Michael Arnold, University of Melbourne, Australia

22. Nonanthropocentrism and the Nonhuman in Design: Possibilities for Designing New Forms of Engagement with and through Technology
Carl DiSalvo, & Jonathan Lukens, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

23. Building the Open Source City: Changing Work Environments for Collaboration and Innovation
Laura Forlano, Cornell University, USA

24. Dramatic Character Development Personas to Tailor Apartment Designs for Different Residential Lifestyles
Marcus Foth, Christine Satchell, Mark Bilandzic, Greg Hearn, & Danielle Shelton, QUT, Australia

Epilogue

Judith Donath, MIT, USA

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I Wish This Was

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“I wish this was” project: local citizens as placemakers …

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Social Cities of Tomorrow » International conference 17 February 2012, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Using digital media technologies for collective urban issues

Our everyday lives are increasingly shaped by digital media technologies, from smart cards and intelligent GPS systems to social media and smartphones. How can we use digital media technologies to make our cities more social, rather than just more hi-tech?

This international conference brings together key thinkers and doers working in the fields of new media and urbanism. Keynote speakers such as Usman Haque, Natalie Jeremijenko will speak about the promises and challenges in this newly emerging and highly interdisciplinary field of urban design. The keynotes will be accompanied by presentations of ‘best practices’ from various disciplines, such as architecture, art, design, and policy.

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MIT TechTV – Changing research

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Some more pecha kucha presentations on “Changing research”
from the Forum on Future Cities.

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MIT TechTV – Changing life

forumfuturecities

“Changing Life” Panel Presentations from
Senseable City Lab | Forum on Future Cities, April 2011

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ALPHA-VILLE 2011 PROGRAMME: Mediating Mediums – The Digital 3d

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The upcoming alpha-ville festival in London features a whole line of interesting workshops, screenings and live action…

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Exterior 3D Projection at #YouTubePlay: Live From the #Guggenheim

Nice example of 3d video mapping, re-contextualizing the buildings structure…

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Networked City: At a Festival Where the World Gets Reprogrammed | Motherboard

“If the entire city is going to be addressable, and scriptable and query-able, then we should be thinking about what kinds of networked cities we want to be living in.”

For their most recent conference, FutureEverything invited Motherboard to come play in Manchester, a city that is both an urban and digital sandpit. From found art in Google Street View to tracking anti-social behavior in your vicinity, to the simple act of “checking-in,” FutureEverything – and its founder Drew Hemment – shows that technology can be as sinister as it is enabling. But if the increasing presence of technologies in our everyday lives can lead to estrangement or control, they can also, as some of these technologists are demonstrating, create a whole new way of thinking about and remaking the city.

via Cognitive Cities

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EyeWriter Initiative

Truly a great initiative!

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Open Up Workshop – projects for the LED FACADE at the MediaLab-Prado

Open Up is an advanced project development workshop for the digital facade of Medialab-Prado. From February 9 through 23, working groups will develop selected projects in a collaborative way.

The event includes theoretical activities February 9, 10 and 16 with lectures by the teachers of the workshop and also Erkki Huhtamo and Jennifer Steimkamp.

Tutors include Jordi Claramonte, Chandler McWilliams, Casey Reas and Víctor Viña. Directed by Nerea Calvillo.

The selected projects that are currently being developed in the workshops can be found here. Also, the working process is being documented through the workshop blog.

About the facade

Langarita–Navarro Arquitectos‘ Led wall at the Medialab-Prado in central Madrid is an interactive façade that aims to be a space for exchange and communication with both visitors and locals, a commission by the Madrid Town Council to develop social interaction and to offer a new digital landmark for their city which is often so closely guarded from development. 144m2 of wall space is covered with some 35,000 Led nodes that are configured to allow both still and moving imagery, allowing the wall, with it’s simple traditional madrileño definition to come alive with psychedelic imagery.

More technical info on the digital facade can be found here.

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